Google’s Espresso networking tech takes SD-WAN to internet scale


Google is working to accelerate the performance of its applications over the internet by building out a software-defined network at broad scale. On Tuesday, the company announced Espresso, a system that provides increased network performance to users of the company’s applications.

It works by applying software-defined networking to the edge of the tech titan’s network, where Google connects to the peer networks of other internet service providers. Rather than rely on individual routers to figure out the best way to direct internet traffic, Espresso hands that responsibility off to servers running in the data centers Google operates at the edge of its network.

Espresso aggregates all the data about network performance from across its peering points and uses that to dynamically direct traffic to users. That allows Google to offer major performance improvements, instead of sending users information from a static point based on their IP addresses or the addresses of their DNS resolvers.

“And we’ve actually pulled the brains of the routing protocol out of individual routers,” Google Fellow Amin Vahdat said. “So we no longer have all of the functionality residing on high-end routers, we actually can leverage more commodity devices, more commodity network elements, and push all of the functionality out of the router boxes onto our server banks.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *